Village of Hope Stories – Xavier

I really hope people know that the praise I have to give is genuine and it’s one of the places that I will constantly look back on to tell people about and share my experience with anybody that is not only struggling, but is curious. That place changed my life.”
— Xavier

 

“I really hope people know that the praise I have to give is genuine and it’s one of the places that I will constantly look back on to tell people about and share my experience with anybody that is not only struggling, but is curious. That place changed my life. I can’t even put into words how meaningful it is to me.”

The main reason I ended up going happened when I was 16 right after COVID shut down all the schools. For a while since middle school I had been on and off experimenting with this and that and the environment and circle I was around was not the most beneficial. But eventually as high school went on I started to develop a lot more mental health issues. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the Centre, but I always knew it was a problem from the beginning since I was a little kid, but I was never medicated. Being unmedicated led to a lot of different things including having no motivation, different personal issues, and I dealt with a lot of anxiety and depression for a while.

I found my release or coping mechanism and escape from whatever was going on personally at school or at home through using a variety of anything I could get my hands on. And that developed into a pretty extreme addiction. I didn’t realize how dangerous using a combination of drugs was at the time. That can stop your heart flat out. The reason I didn’t realize it was so dangerous was because in my mind it just fixed everything for me. I didn’t realize that it just puts it off and puts it off, but it doesn’t fix anything, it just delays it. Once I started to get into harder drugs, I was surrounding myself with a lot more people that didnt do anything to drift me away from that. The people that were around me that were there from the beginning were telling me ‘you need to stop, this is getting into a problem here.’ But there was a denial factor too so I had no idea what I was doing. To me, it just solved anything that was going on with my mental health at the time. Because of that it made it harder and harder for me to hide what I was doing. Eventually it took over my life as a whole. Anything I could possibly think of was getting my next fix. It was the only thing I thought of.

I also wasn’t having a lot of connection between me and my parents at the time. I was 16 in the 10th grade. Once I started becoming more careless and only focusing on using, it drove that further apart. Some fights here and there, leaving the house, and a lot of family drama. Eventually it got to the point where I had to come clean. I did some things that I’m not proud of that I know I should not have done. So I came clean about it and told them this is what is going on. I’m using every single day, using too much, and I’m surprised I haven’t OD’d countless times. They were accepting and supporting of that but I didn’t go for help right away, since we didn’t really have experience going to professionals to get therapy or counseling. We thought we would work it out and fix it and get better and heal, it’s just a bump in the road. That’s how we approached it at first. I guess it was kind of ignorant of us to just assume it would be fine because then COVID hit and I was just sitting at home and I had a pretty bad relapse.

My parents noticed those warning signs of getting back into use. The agitation, I was always upset and angry, and I was always going out for long periods of time. They noticed those warning signs really early, which I was upset about at first because I was still in denial, but now I am very grateful that they did. They confronted me about it and I had to come clean again. I ended up getting to the point where I was so upset, not even just with myself for slipping, but also the way my life had turned out. Because there was a really big switch between who I was as a child and who I was as a teenager. I ended up getting to the point where I asked them to send me somewhere. Because nothing is going to change if I keep doing this cycle. That upset them to see me get to that point where I didn’t care where I was going and who I was and what was to come. They were sad that that is what it had come to.

We ended up driving to CHEO and we spoke to one of the nurses there who looped in the mental health workers in the unit to help me. It just so happened that the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre (DSYTC) was just reopening their availability for beds after COVID and luckily they were doing intakes. They had just reopened the waitless and it couldn’t have been a better coincidence for me to have a crisis at that point. My parents had heard about it before, but when it’s an inpatient treatment facility it can be scary to look into it. There is a stigma to it. We ended up deciding to just fill in the forms right away to see where it went and I was super hopeful for it. I knew if I could get into in-patient treatment then it would help. I could also have a break from being around the negative influences I was surrounding myself with. Luckily it was a lot more than that.

I genuinely don’t know if i would be alive if I didn’t go there to put it into perspective. Within 2-3 days I was contacted by the centre to start the intake screening to get me admitted onto the waitlist. Then within 2 weeks I was packed and ready to go. I told all my friends and family this is what I had to do and I’ll be back in three months. I had tried to do it on my own, but I needed to go somewhere where I had people around me that were in a similar situation and people to support me both emotionally, mentally and professionally. I can’t do anything else on my own. I went and did 70 days (at the time 45 days was completion and anything else was extra. It is now 90). I think being in the house changed who I was in a better way.

I consider myself lucky to have even gotten in. I think it was by chance that it happened to be at a good time. I don’t know where I would be if I didn’t go. Realistically it wouldn’t have been in a place that was good or I might not even be alive.

At that point, I started to realize I had no idea what I wanted to do when I got out. What I wanted to do with school. I was barely in the 12th grade, but this was taking all my focus right now. So that shifted my focus as to who I was. I had different skills from all the groups. I was able to get credits for high school and find where I wanted to go in my last year of high school. I ended up finding that being in that environment was where I wanted to be forever. So I took my 12th grade to get as many psychology or social work based classes as I could. Did a co-op at a wellness centre because after I got out I wanted to go back even just to talk to the staff again. I loved being there. I found a second home there in a way. Being able to have people and adults around me who took the time to understand what I was upset about, even if it was the smallest thing, and to genuinely want to sit down and talk about what was going on was a really meaningful experience for me.

Finishing up grade 12, I knew where I was going and kept in touch with the different counselors to have some extra support on the side. My counselor at the time helped me find out how I could go back. I told her how that place has a special meaning to me and it’s very important to me. I want to go back but the only thing I could think of that I’m good at is this. So, what if I switch the roles and I work from the other side of the table and give the same thing that I got.

Right now I’m in my last few weeks of the Social Service Worker program at Algonquin College. I’m doing my year-long placement at Rideauwood to go back and work in the addictions and mental health field. It’s ironic because my main goal is to go back and be a staff at the Dave Smith centre. That’s my main goal and I don’t think that’s too far from coming true.

Looking back at my experience, we had people all over the province coming. I’m from Ottawa not too far from the centre, but being able to see people come from all over the province just to come to this place is an incredible thing for me to see. Not only does it impact so many people per year but it also is one of the only places that has that kind of program in the city as well as the province. It also allows anybody in any situation financially, social class, anything to be able to access help they need. I never had an experience there where I felt the staff didn’t know what they were doing. I never felt I was being treated like a number instead of a person. I always felt they saw me for who I am and they wanted to help. I was never just another client. I have nothing bad to say about the centre, that place changed my life. I can’t even put into words how meaningful it is to me.

I think the new Centre will also be a positive thing. In terms of impact on the community and people who will be using services at the new site, I think it is beneficial that it’s bigger, more centralized and it will allow for that intake number to go up and for more people to be able to get access in the long run. Being able to see the development of having the smaller services and having this success and being able to combine it into a bigger centre and create something on a larger scale.

I really hope people know that the praise I have to give is genuine and it’s one of the places that I will constantly look back on to tell people about and share my experience with anybody that is not only struggling, but is curious. When I was accessing services there it made me be able to have this acceptance of what issues I was facing. Everybody, including all the staff and the counselors, were very adamant about ensuring that people knew this doesn’t define them. It’s something they’ve been through, but it’s not who they are. It’s something they have. Which is one of the reasons I’m so open with everybody because I know now it’s not who I am. My addiction isn’t who I am, it’s just something that I’ve had. And that’s one of the things I really had to get into my head and a lot of the staff really helped me to realize that. They’re great there and that’s all I can say.

I hope that I can at least do something for somebody – at least one person.

Xavier is a former client of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 
 
 
 




Grand Opening May 2024!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Patrick

“I can’t put into words how much Dave Smith helped me. Without them, I’d probably still be struggling with addiction. Now, I’m studying welding in college, something I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid.”
— Patrick

 

“I can’t put into words how much Dave Smith helped me. Without them, I’d probably still be struggling with addiction. Now, I’m studying welding in college, something I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid.”

My substance use started in high school. At first, I was smoking marijuana, but in grade 10 and 11 I started using heavier drugs like Xanax. It progressively got worse. In grade 12, I dropped out of high school halfway through and I went to work in construction for a little while. I stayed sober for that. But then I ran with the wrong crowd of people, and then that’s when I got back into addiction.

From my perspective, I felt like I just had a rough time growing up, with all these things going on around me. I lost people too, including a friend who died in a car accident, and that didn’t help. I struggled with depression throughout high school, and all these things led up to me making the wrong decisions. I was using drugs to numb my emotions and my thoughts – to keep them away. I knew it wasn’t good. It wasn’t the right way to cope.

I was using a lot of downers, including heroin and fentanyl, and I was hanging around with the wrong people. I knew it was a bad idea, but with the addiction talking, I did it anyway. After a while, I realized this was not the life I wanted to live, so I started looking into treatments. That’s when I found Dave Smith.

I talked to my friend and tried to get her interested in treatment, too, but she said, “nope”. I had to make the right decision for myself, so I called them. I learned that they would have an opening in the next few months and were willing to take me in. Dave Smith was the only place I called, and I was pretty happy about it.

Before I arrived at Dave Smith, I was really nervous. Even as we were driving in, I told my parents I didn’t want to do this. But they suggested I just try it. My first day there, I started to calm down, to settle in. I was still feeling very anxious because, to be honest, I didn’t know what was going to happen over the next three months. I didn’t know if it was going to help me or if I was going to be wasting my time. I was nervous about being away from home and in a brand-new environment and then the addiction was also talking, telling me, “Why quit now?”
I spent a lot of my time at the Centre writing stuff down, figuring things out and having an inner dialogue with myself about problematic situations. I was not self-aware at all in high school. I had to learn to set my own rules and boundaries for myself and to respect them.

The staff at Dave Smith are great. They’re really easy to talk to, and their problem-solving skills are amazing. They definitely helped me out in developing my own – having them show me how they go through the situations I went through. They helped me learn to ask myself, “Is this really a problem right now? Or is this not that big of a deal?”
I participated a lot in the group therapy sessions and they were very helpful. Just hearing other people’s stories and knowing you’re not the only one going through something. It’s motivating to hear other people’s stories and help each other out.

I didn’t want to leave when the three months ended, but the aftercare was really good. It was good talking to my counselor. He was a great guy and it was nice to have a chat every week so he could see how things were going and to make sure I was still on track with my goals. I wasn’t sure I would be able to do it on my own, but having that support afterwards really helped me.
I also went down to the dock every day to fish. It’s something I did a lot with my dad when I was a kid, and I enjoy it a lot. It’s so calming. I can sit there all day and I don’t have any worries about anything.

I can’t put into words how much Dave Smith helped me. I’d probably still be struggling with addiction to be honest with you. Now, I’m studying welding in college. It’s something I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid. I have one more semester to go and then I’ll be done.

There are really good people at Dave Smith. The staff are open-minded. They are there to help you. That’s something I think all the new people coming in should know about

Patrick is a former client of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 
 
 
 




Grand Opening May 2024!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Nena

“Food is my love language. Seeing our clients eat well and take care of their bodies has been the most fulfilling aspect of doing what I love.”
— Nena

 

“Food is my love language. Seeing our clients eat well and take care of their bodies has been the most fulfilling aspect of doing what I love.”

Nena Ngo may be known for her yummy desserts and breads, but that’s just the beginning. She wants clients at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre (DSYTC) to try all her creations. And when one of them asks to take a list of recipes home, Nena says she knows she’s accomplished something wonderful.

Nena has been the Chef at the Carp campus for two years and her journey to get there was an interesting one. She has a degree in engineering, has lived all over the world and has worked at many restaurants, including one of her own. “I needed a break and wasn’t sure what to do. The pandemic didn’t help,” she remembers. “I didn’t know much about the Centre but have witnessed so much addiction and mental illness in the restaurant industry that I wanted to try and help. That led to a full-time position. It has worked out really well.”

Nena provides meals for the youth in the program as well as staff. She develops meal plans, lessons, sources food and cooks everything from scratch. “The clients are so nice and deserve a chance to love themselves again. I try to get to know each person through food. What makes them comfortable? What provides a good memory? Maybe it’s something their Mom or Dad made for them or something they ate as a child or something they’ve always wanted to try but did not have the resources or the opportunity to do so.”

These culinary discussions also provide an opportunity to talk about science and the many misconceptions about food, fad diets and unhealthy eating habits. “It’s really back to the basics and it’s all about balance and understanding what your body needs to be happy and functional,” says Nena.

Moving to the new Centre is an exciting time and Nena says she can’t wait to work in the kitchen: “The new design and layout will allow me to create and expand the menus and lessons.”
“I live and breathe food,” sums up Nena. “I just want people to see it, eat it and enjoy it!” Definitely a labour of love!

Nena is the Chef at the Carp site. She says she is looking forward to moving into the kitchen at the new centre!

 
 
 
 




Grand Opening May 2024!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Adrien

“I’ve learnt so much from DSYTC, I’m a different person than I was 3 months ago. I want to have a good life now because I know I deserve it, I want change.”
— Adrien

 

Adrien’s story: “I’ve learnt so much from DSYTC, I’m a different person than I was 3 months ago. I want to have a good life now because I know I deserve it, I want change.”

My name is Adrien and I’ve been an addict for 5 years. 5 years wasted, 5 years of feeling lost, and hopeless. I’m 18 now and I’m so glad I got the help I needed and took control of my life. I was high 24/7 and getting nothing done. I couldn’t hold a job for over 4 months and quite honestly was only working to feed my addictions. I’ve always known I needed help, just never had the guts to put it into action, but when I needed to switch to dabs I knew, or when it was either get help or be homeless. I’m so glad I did.

I’ve learnt so much from DSYTC, I’m a different person than I was 3 months ago. I want to have a good life now because I know I deserve it, I want change. This program has taught me so many tips and tricks, not just for addiction but for mental health as well. The environment here makes it so easy to learn and to understand what’s needed to battle addiction, from the groups, the pro-socials and being able to express your problems and who you are without judgment. I’ve rediscovered a part of myself that I thought was lost and never coming back. And I’ve worked through so many problems I never wanted to bring to light with my therapist. The staff here are incredible, they’re so involved with helping you succeed and just being there to talk about whatever, whenever. The schedule was difficult to get used to, I didn’t enjoy the early wake-up times at first, but having a rigid schedule makes treatment a lot easier.

DSYTC has also helped me come a lot closer to completing my high school diploma (something I never thought I could do). Thanks to the amazing teacher here, the one-on-one help and learning made it easy to complete 3 credits here plus the 2 you get for staying 3 months.

The person I was before here was lazy and inconsiderate. I did not care what happened to me or where I was going in life, now I do. My mindset has drastically changed for the better along with my confidence and mental health. Moving forward from here is scary but I could not be more ready. I can see a good future now, I have a job lined up and I’m excited to work for once, and to save money. I’m going to be a part of my family again, I’m going to enjoy doing activities again, ones I rediscovered here.

I recommend this program to any youth struggling with addiction to give this place a shot because your success and your future are worth it. The 3 months of discomfort is nothing compared to the bright future ahead of you. You are worth it.

Adrien is a client of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Erin

“When I got here, I knew this was where I was meant to be.”
— Erin

 

Erin’s story: “When I got here, I knew this was where I was meant to be.”

I was at a point where I was looking for help but wasn’t sure where to go. Dave Smith was recommended to me by someone I knew. I didn’t agree to it right away. It was another month or two before Erin Johnston graduated from the University of Victoria with a degree in child and youth care – but she never actually went to British Columbia because of the pandemic. All her classes were online from her home near Ottawa. In some ways, her real classroom was at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre (DSYTC) where she completed her internship and never looked back.

“When I got here, I knew this was where I was meant to be,” says Erin. “They welcomed me with open arms – and masks!”

Erin says this work has always been in her wheelhouse. Her parents fostered teenage girls when she was growing up, she spent summers at a camp in New Jersey and she studied social work at Algonquin College.

Now, she is an Addiction Counsellor and the Campus Lead in Carleton Place. “Every day, I see someone who comes in with hesitation or perhaps pressure. This might not be their first choice of where to be. But we see them press into the program and transform their lives, right before our eyes.”

Perhaps the best part of the job is meeting a graduate and talking about the impact of the program: “It’s a solid reminder of why we get up every day and come here,” she says. “Big changes can happen in a short amount of time.”

Erin says she is really excited to move to the new building, with everyone under one roof. “We will be able to share resources and bounce ideas of each other,” she says. “We can look at ways to move forward together.”

Erin is the Campus Lead and an Addictions Counsellor in Carleton Place.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

2024-08-08 — 3-Club Challenge Night Golf Tournament

3-Club Challenge Night Gold Tournament
THU, AUGUST 8, 2024
1927 Richardson Side Road, Kanata, ON

Join us for the 3-Club Challenge Night golf tournament.

Thursday, August 8th, 2024 at The Thunderbird Sports Centre.
1927 Richardson Side Road, Kanata, ON

For more information on the contact Abby by email: abby@tmsiottawa.com

Sponsorship packages are available.
Please visit thunderbirdsportscentre.com to sponsor or register a team.

Village of Hope Stories – Summer

“It was nice to be around people who understand and are kind of going through the same situation, even though it may not be the exact same problem.”
— Summer

 

Summer’s story: “It was nice to be around people who understand and are kind of going through the same situation, even though it may not be the exact same problem.”

I was at a point where I was looking for help but wasn’t sure where to go. Dave Smith was recommended to me by someone I knew. I didn’t agree to it right away. It was another month or two before I decided to contact them.

It took a while for me to get to the point where I felt like I needed to get help. But my drinking had escalated a lot. It kind of goes back to high school, and it got worse when I started university. Basically, I was just drinking all day and unable to do anything. I somehow managed to get through the semester, but that was with me going home and sobering up. And then I would go back to school and start the process all over again.

Drinking was always sort of an alone activity for me. Like, I would drink with other people, but even when I was first getting into it in high school, it was really me doing it alone, doing it before school, and doing it in situations where a lot of other people weren’t. At first it was just at night, and I kept to that for a few years, but then, by my fourth year of university, it was an all-day thing. I mean, when you get to that point, there’s not a lot you can do other than just keep going and watch things fall apart – or fix the problem.

I was 21 when I finally went to Dave Smith. It had been months of me drinking all day. It’s very tiring, and I just realized I wasn’t going to be able to stop by myself. I had tried different things, and nothing worked. I didn’t know what else to do. There was no way I was going to get through another semester like that, and I just needed to do something, so I tried Dave Smith.

Being at Dave Smith was hard for me at first. I didn’t want to go and be away from home, and have to put my life on hold, but I did want the help. I felt like I had to be there, and I knew I needed to do something. It was an adjustment, for sure, being around a lot of different people in a different place, and just having people around 24/7. After the first week, though, I got used to it, and by the end of my stay I was sad to leave.

It was a good environment, a good experience. The staff were all great, and to have them there supporting me through whatever I was choosing to do was really helpful. Also, the other people there, just getting to talk to them and having them there whenever I wanted or needed, it was great. It’s nice to be around people who understand and are kind of going through the same situation, even though it may not be the exact same problem.

I got out of treatment at the end of May last year. Recently, things have been going well. When I first got out it was a bit rocky. I was starting to try to go back to drinking like I used to, but I was living at home and my parents were more cognizant of what I was doing, which made it difficult. Then, when I went back to school in September, I had a few slips. The difference was that I wasn’t trying to hide it anymore. I would reach out to my Mom or my Assertive Continuing Care (ACC) counselor from Dave Smith. I knew it wasn’t something I wanted for myself anymore. That’s a big change.

Overall, the fall semester went decently well, and I haven’t had anything to drink for over three months now. Also, a lot of things have been happening that I didn’t expect to happen. I’ve been showing myself that I can do things that I didn’t think I could, and that’s been great.

It’s important for people to know that, even if you don’t think anything is going to work, just try. I didn’t think there was hope for me, but Dave Smith helped. I would encourage anyone who is in the same position I was in to just go and see what comes of it. Don’t give up.

Summer is a former client of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

2024-07-18 — Drop The Shame and Get In The Game

7th Annual Drop The Shame and Get In The Game
THU, JULY 18, 2024
The Marshes Golf Club

Join us for the 7th Annual Drop The Shame and Get In The Game golf tournament.

Thursday, July 18th, 2024 at The Marshes Golf Club.

For more information on the tournament contact:
Hunter Knight (Tournament Founder)
Email: Hunter@droptheshame.ca

Sponsorship packages are available.
Please visit droptheshame.ca to sponsor or register a team.

2024-03-28 — Tiki Tropic Trivia: Sip, Solve & Sway

Tiki Tropic Trivia: Sip, Solve & Sway
Wednesday, Mar 28, 2024 – 6-9pm
Clocktower Brew Pub Rideau

Escape the winter chill and join TropiCrew for an unforgettable evening at the Tiki Tropic Trivia: Sip, Solve & Sway our tropical-themed fundraising event to benefit the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre. We will be waiting for you at ClockTower Brew Pub Rideau on March 28th from 6:00-9:00 pm to make the magic happen. Make sure to dress up in your hottest tropical attire to feel the heat of a hula dance demonstration transporting you to our Caribbean paradise.

Be ready to sway the evening to the sound of ukuleles and be challenged by our Tropical Trivia while learning fascinating facts about this enchanting region. Enjoy the flavours of the tropics while the one and only, Craig Stephens, demonstrates how to make exotic cocktails that will also be available for purchase throughout the event with a percentage going directly to the DSYTC. Try your luck on our fundraising activities that will go from the savoury tropical-themed donuts from Maverick Donuts for sale on a Chance-to-Win game, 50/50 draw, and our exclusive silent auction with unique prizes and experiences.

Join us at the Tiki Tropic Trivia for an evening of giving, dancing, and tropical delights. Together, we can make a difference in the lives of the youth at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.
Tickets are $15.00 with all proceeds going to the Dave Smith Treatment Centre.

For more information and to purchase tickets please visit our website or email us at tikitropictrivia@gmail.com. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and Instagram @tikitropictrivia

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2024 – 6-9pm
Clocktower Brew Pub Rideau

2024-03-27 — Namaste Mabuhay

Namaste Mabuhay
Tuesday, Mar 27, 2024 – 6-9pm
East India Company


Namaste Mabuhay – A taste of India and a slice of the Philippines
Step into the vibrant world of ‘Namaste Mabuhay,’ an enchanting fusion trivia affair celebrating India and the Philippines.

Join us at East India Company on March 27, 2024 from 6pm to 9pm, an event that promises a feast for your senses. Prepare to savour the delicate aroma of teas, engage in thrilling prize opportunities, witness the intricate artistry of henna mehndi, demonstrate your knowledge about India and Philippine trivia, and enjoy the thrilling game of ball pong.

This fundraising event for the Dave Smith Foundation includes a click-to-donate, 32auctions, and silent auction. Delve into our exquisite silent auction, brimming with treasures that echo the essence of these diverse cultures. Embark on a cultural voyage, exploring the rich flavors of India and the Philippines. Each ticket not only invites you to a cultural celebration but contributes to building a brighter future for youth.

For more information about the charity, or to register for event/action or donate, please visit us at: https://namastemabuhay.wixsite.com/group3
REGISTER TODAY!
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/namastemabuhay03/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=61554590728828

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2024 – 6-9pm
East India Company

2024-03-24 — A Garden Tea Party

A Garden Tea Party: Nourish the Earth
One Sip at a Time!
Sunday, Mar 24, 2024 – 1-3:30pm
Parlour
Wellington St., Ottawa

A Garden Tea Party: Nourish the Earth One Sip at a Time!

Get ready to embark on a whimsical journey at our Garden Tea Party! Join us on Sunday March 24th, 2024, from 1:00pm- 3:30pm, at the fabulous Parlour on Wellington.

Picture-perfect moments await you at our Photo Garden Oasis, where a magical flower wall backdrop sets the stage for capturing timeless memories that will last a lifetime. Dive into a Save Soil Speaker session that goes beyond enlightening you on soil conservation – it also empowers you with sustainable agricultural practices. Become a tea blend artist at our “Create Your Tea Blend Workshop” and embark on a sensory journey like never before with our tea tasting guided by our tea sommelier.

Surround yourself in the enchanting garden ambiance as our live music adds a magical touch that carries you away on a whimsical journey. Participate in a 50/50 draw, bid on enticing items at our silent auction, enter our chance to win to draw for fabulous prizes and indulge your senses at our Portable Flower Boutique, offering an interactive floral experience like no other. 100% of the proceeds raised will go to the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre, an organization dedicated to helping young individuals overcome substance use.

Come and join us nourish the Earth, One Sip at a Time and purchase your ticket today for $18!
For more information and to purchase tickets, visit https://agardenteaparty.wixsite.com/teaparty or our social media @agardenteaparty.

If you would like to volunteer at our event, please fill out this form.

Sunday, Mar 24, 2024 – 1-3:30pm
Parlour
Wellington St., Ottawa

2024-03-22 — Bolly Beats Bash

Bolly Beats Bash
Friday, Mar 22, 2024 – 6-9pm
East India Company
Robertson Road, Ottawa

Get ready to feel the rhythm and hear the pulse of Bollywood’s vibrant beats.

Pull aside the velvet curtain and step into “Bollybeats Bash” on Friday, March 22 begins at the East India Company Restaurant at Ottawa’s Robertson Road. Experience the rich cultural tapestry of Bollywood, seamlessly woven into every aspect of the event.

Enjoy captivating live performances, including soulful singing that will transport you to the heart of India. Indulge in the intricate artistry of henna, adding a touch of tradition and elegance to your evening. Explore the silent auction table for unique treasures, knowing that your bids contribute to a noble cause.

Join us in supporting the mission of the Dave Smith Foundation. Your participation in the “Bollybeats Bash” not only promises an unforgettable evening but also contributes to a worthy cause.

Doors open at 6:00 pm and tickets are only $15.
Event Website: https://shorturl.at/jEN35

To purchase tickets or for more information, please visit our website or email us at: dhaw0018@algonquinlive.com.

Don’t forget to check out our social media at ”bollybeats_bash2024”
https://shorturl.at/iBNO9

Friday, Mar 22, 2024 – 6-9pm
East India Company
Robertson Road, Ottawa

2024-03-21 — Art in Bloom Spring Craft Night

Art in Bloom Spring Craft Night
Thursday, Mar 21, 2024 – 6-9pm
6-430 Hazeldean Road
Kanata, Ottawa


Come celebrate the dawning of spring and let your creativity blossom! Step into a world of pastels and palettes on Thursday, March 21st at Head Office in Kanata, from 6:00-9:00 pm.

With dynamic art instructors to guide you on a journey through spring, you will get to experience two creative workshops and leave with charming crafts. Explore the world of watercolour while painting a delicate spring bookmark. Build your own bouquet of paper origami flowers, whose soft pastel colours will never fade.

100% of our event’s proceeds are going to the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Center to give youth battling the use of substances a brighter tomorrow. Come explore the vibrant world of art while supporting our cause and purchase your tickets today for $20.00.

For more information, check out our website or our social media @ArtInBloomCrafts.

Thursday, Mar 21, 2024 – 6-9pm
6-430 Hazeldean Road
Kanata, Ottawa

2024-03-20 — A Night With The Stars

A Night With The Stars
Wednesday, Mar 20, 2024 – 6-9pm
3 Brewers
Sparks St., Ottawa

A Night With The Stars: Lights! Camera! Trivia!

Join us in walking the red carpet at A Night with the Stars: Lights, Camera, Trivia! On Wednesday, March 20th, 2024, from 6 to 9 PM, The 3 Brewers on Sparks Street will be transformed for an evening of glitz and glamour!

Dress your best, break out your formal wear, and join us for an unforgettable evening of nostalgia. During the evening you can test your knowledge at our big showstopper, the 2000s-decade movie trivia.

Guests will experience an exhilarating dance performance, bringing a favourite movie to life right before your eyes. Our judges will look out for those best dressed, or with star quality, for a chance to win a golden award during the closing ceremony.

There will be a chance to take home some dazzling prizes from our chance to win game, silent auction and 50/50 draw. All proceeds will go to the Dave Youth Treatment Centre. Don’t miss out on your chance to grab a $15 one-way ticket to Hollywood available on our website.

Follow us on socials! Facebook: A Night With The Stars 2024 Instagram: anwts_2024 Tiktok: anwts_2024
Find us with the Hashtags: #ANWTS #anightwiththestars

Wednesday, Mar 20, 2024 – 6-9pm
3 Brewers
Sparks St., Ottawa

Village of Hope Stories – Shana

“I think the biggest thing for me is to get my students engaged in their academics, in their life, and in wanting to be a lifelong learner. My overall goal is for my students to embrace their self-worth and have hope about their futures.”
— Shana

 

Shana’s story: “I think the biggest thing for me is to get my students engaged in their academics, in their life, and in wanting to be a lifelong learner. My overall goal is for my students to embrace their self-worth and have hope about their futures.”

As a teacher at the boys’ facility in Carleton Place since 2012. I provide academic support to our clients, primarily for grades nine to 12. I try my best to tailor the curriculum to where they’re at when they arrive. They may be close to graduating and need to finish some credits, or they may be in grade nine and just starting out with compulsory courses. Some guys come in who haven’t been in school for years. In a lot of ways, it’s like a one-room schoolhouse where everyone is working at their own level and towards their own personal goals.

They all come in with different abilities, different interests, and different educational needs. It’s about trying to meet them where they are, understand their goals for when they leave DSYTC, and figure out, sometimes day by day, what will work best for them to be successful. I think the biggest thing for me is to get them engaged in their academics, in their life, and in wanting to be a lifelong learner. My overall goal is for my students to embrace their self-worth, have hope about their futures and to become reconnected with themselves. Finding opportunities to empower my students to expand their knowledge of various post-secondary options and careers that interest them is so important. This helps build their confidence and get them excited for their futures.

When I was in university, I did a placement at a provincial group home school for students with mental health issues. It was a unique placement in a smaller setting, and I walked away from that experience thinking that this was something I’d really like to do one day. The opportunity to work one-on-one with students is so rewarding. While I did start out in a mainstream high school, I also spent 10 years working with students in a day program at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre before I applied to the DSYTC, whose philosophy and approach really appealed to me. Having all these different supports in place and being able to go to school while living in treatment is huge for these kids, so they don’t miss out on their academics.

I think the services DSYTC provides are close to all of us. I think that people should know that the clients here are amazing humans who are working hard to improve their lives. Their effort, courage, and perseverance are admirable. There is so much support here, and the clients are learning strategies – and gaining insights – that they’ll have with them for the rest of their lives. You can’t wave a magic wand and never have any issues arise again as life is unpredictable. But they are learning so many skills that they’re going to take with them that go far beyond the reasons they came here in the first place.

All my students inspire me in different ways. Observing the growth and work they are investing in themselves by taking advantage of the opportunity to catch up academically or work ahead is quite inspiring. Those moments when you see things coming together or when you witness them express excitement about their future endeavors are the best days! It is a privilege I am proud to be a part of.

Shana Kendall is a teacher at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

2024-03-19 — Namaste Canada

Namaste Canada
Tuesday, Mar 19, 2024 – 5-7pm
Rang De Indian Cuisine

Hey there! Join our fantastic team for a super fun event called Namaste Canada on March 19, 2024, from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM at Rang De Indian Cuisine.

Picture this: you’re in the lively streets of India, surrounded by amazing smells and happy laughter. The awesome chefs will be cooking up some savoury Indian dishes for you! Plus, you can try cool things like tying a turban, getting beautiful henna designs, and playing fun Indian games.

But that’s not all! We’re also doing things for a good cause. We’re raising money for the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre, which helps youth battling the use of substances. You can bid on cool stuff in our silent auctions or try your luck in the 50/50 draw. All this fun is just $10, and you can get your tickets on our website.

Come join us! Let’s have a blast together and make a difference. You can also find us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Can’t wait to see you there!

Tuesday, Mar 19, 2024 – 5-7pm
Rang De Indian Cuisine

2024-03-14 — House of Groove

House of Groove
Thursday, Mar 14, 2024 – 7-10pm
House of TARG
Bank St., Ottawa


Boogie on, Dance Along, Silent Disco

Come let out your Silent Disco “Boogie Fever” at House of TARG! On Thursday March 14th from 7-10pm.

Experience an evening that will take you back in time to the 70s era listening to the high-energy sounds of Earth, Wind, and Fire; The BeeGees; ABBA; The Jackson 5; and many other icons of the era!

Choose your rad tunes from 3 groovy DJs playing different music through silent headphones. Experience a blast from the past like no other while enjoying clanging pinball machines, dancing, a live photo booth, heart-racing arcade games, savoury perogies, 70’s themed drinks, and potentially winning big at our silent auction. Make sure to wear your best 70’s themed outfit for the chance to win a prize!

Tickets are $15 per person and all proceeds support our chosen charity, The Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre. Let’s help build a new treatment centre for youth ages 13-21.

To purchase tickets or for more information, visit our website https://bit.ly/acsilentdisco, or our social media pages @acsilentdisco on TikTok, https://bit.ly/facebookacsilentdisco for Facebook, and @acsilentdisco613 on Instagram with the hashtags #silentdisco, #houseofgroove, and #davesmithyouthtreatment, or email us at acsilentdisco@gmail.com.

Bring your Groove!

Thursday, Mar 14, 2024 – 7-10pm
House of TARG
Bank St., Ottawa

Village of Hope Stories – Imran

“Being told I needed to go to treatment was one of the most difficult things to come to terms with.”
— Imran

 

Imran’s story: “Being told I needed to go to treatment was one of the most difficult things to come to terms with.”

Being told I needed to go to treatment was one of the most difficult things to come to terms with. Coming into DSYTC I was very close minded and had no intentions to change my behavior once I got out. The lifestyle I was living at home was not maintainable. I was using substances almost every day and using them at school. This caused my grades to decline which was followed by arguments with my parents. The substance use at school got to a point that my school had to take action and give me an ultimatum: “Either seek treatment or be expelled from school.”

The first few weeks of treatment was probably one of the hardest, I felt very isolated and alone. I was very lucky to have come in with a great group of guys who were very welcoming and accepting. I remember on the first day one of the clients came up to me and introduced himself and shook my hand. I don’t think that client realized how much of an effect that one small act of kindness had on me, that moment I realized that it was going to be okay. After I started to settle into the new environment I began to open up and embrace the treatment programming. Being at DSYTC you can either reject the help and services they have here or take advantage of all the great positives of the program.

The schooling here has helped me significantly, having a great teacher like Shana made all the difference and really motivated me to get things done. With the help from Shana to complete a school credit and gaining two Dave Smith credits I feel prepared to go back to school when I return home. Programming here such as group therapy was a foreign concept to me at first, and I wasn’t open to sharing personal details with people I had just met. As I warmed up to the idea of group therapy, I started to realize that there is good and helpful information being taught. A lot of the skills I learned during group I utilized when dealing with conflict in the house, and when I got to go home for the holidays.

Although sometimes we covered difficult topics that were sometimes uncomfortable to discuss, it almost always triggered insightful and good conversation amongst the clients and staff. The staff members here have been so incredibly helpful and patient with me, I have so much respect for each and every one of them. A lot of the times I felt very different from the guys in here, and don’t share similar interests and hobbies. The staff relieved the feeling of loneliness and isolation and made my stay at Dave Smith a lot easier, and I will always be thankful for their kindness. As crazy as it is to say that I have completed three months of treatment that I dreaded at first, I will for sure take the things that I have learned home with me. The skills I will apply to my life moving forward will be the social skills I learned, how to cope with difficult situations, and refusal skills. Thank you DSYTC.

Imran is a proud graduate of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Sabrina

“Without Dave Smith, I wouldn’t have a relationship with my daughter. Jess would be gone. I don’t think she would be alive today.”
— Sabrina

 

Sabrina’s story: “Without Dave Smith, I wouldn’t have a relationship with my daughter. Jess would be gone. I don’t think she would be alive today.”

Jess started using drugs at 15. We had moved to another city, where she met a new group of friends who were experimenting. I didn’t even know at first that she was using. She just started losing a lot of weight and acting out, sneaking out of the house in the middle of the night. I’d go into her room to wake her up in the morning for school and instead of finding her in her bed, I’d find stuffed animals under her covers.

When I finally did find out that she was using hard drugs – some of her friends were concerned about Jess and told me – I didn’t even believe it at first. My daughter? Meth? There’s no way. Finally, I couldn’t deny it any longer.

I tried tough love: I gave her a choice — go to rehab or leave the house. And when I gave her that choice, she left. I had to watch my 15-year-old daughter pack a little bag and walk out my door. I don’t even know how I survived that.

After Jess left, I managed to befriend some of the people in her new circle – people that I never would have wanted to associate with. But I figured if I could get to know them, I’d always have a phone number to call if Jess didn’t answer her phone. That happened a lot. And some of them seemed to sense that Jess didn’t belong where she was. They’d scramble around to try to find her and contact me to tell me where she was, and that she was OK. I’m really blessed that I had that connection.

One of these people—a 26-year-old guy she’d been hanging around with – helped convince Jess to stay at Dave Smith when we finally got her into treatment, and she was threatening to leave. They made a deal that if she stayed, he would also try to get clean, so I drove him to a facility in North Bay 10 hours away. And he stayed clean too. It was just a blessing.

Jess tried three other facilities before we found Dave Smith, and they weren’t a good fit for her. She also wasn’t ready. I figured Dave Smith would be perfect because it’s for youth, and she finally agreed to try it. For the first three weeks, she kept wanting to leave. It was really, really, tough, because I thought I was going to lose my daughter again. I really did. And I blamed myself because all this started after we moved.

By the grace of God, she stayed. And while Jess was at Dave Smith, I felt like I finally had some support. I knew I wasn’t alone. I drove from Waterloo to Ottawa every single weekend because I wanted Jess to know I was there for her. I had to show her that I was invested in this as much as she was – Dave Smith was saving my daughter’s life.

The Centre has had such a positive influence on Jess’s life because I can see that when she does struggle, her first thought is not, ‘oh, let me go get high,’ which it used to be. She has the tools now to cope in more positive ways. She does yoga breathing techniques. She’s studying Buddhism. And she still has her notebooks from Dave Smith that she’ll go through.

Without Dave Smith, I wouldn’t have a relationship with my daughter. Jess would be gone. I don’t think she would be alive today. When she was using, her personality completely changed. Friends and family were always so important to Jess but when she was using, she became rude and mean. She was lost and wanted no part of family and friends anymore. It was devastating to watch my beautiful, caring daughter transform into someone I didn’t even recognize.

When Jess went to Dave Smith, she came back to herself. She found her love of school again. Seven years later, she is working and saving money to travel after she’s done university. She has all these goals and plans that she’s fulfilling that she didn’t have before. Dave Smith brought me back my daughter and saved her life – and mine, too. I will be forever grateful to DSYTC!

Sabrina is the proud parent of Jess, an alumnus of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Haley

“Honestly, when I got to the Dave Smith Centre, I felt so much weight fall off of me – it was like the pressures of everything around me were gone.”
— Haley

 

“Honestly, when I got to the Dave Smith Centre, I felt so much weight fall off of me – it was like the pressures of everything around me were gone.”

When I was a teenager, I had been having some issues around a lot of things – my family, my peers. I was also playing competitive basketball at a very high level. The other side of my life, when I wasn’t playing, was getting involved in substance use and other unhealthy behaviours and interactions with people.

I switched schools to try and solve the problem on my own, but ended up just going back to it. I started using multiple substances on a daily basis. In hindsight, after reflecting on it for more than a decade, I think I was feeling a lot of pressure. My brothers were both competitive athletes. One brother went to Med school. My parents were amazing, but in the community I grew up in and in my family, there was definitely a need to achieve and I felt like a bit of an imposter. I didn’t know who I was yet.

I was also curious about things. I grew up in suburbia, but I would often take the bus downtown just to see what was going on. I wanted to branch out. But I ended up going in an unhealthy direction and didn’t have the tools to manage it. I started following my peers and just doing what they were doing. After experimenting with substances, they became a crutch for me. I’ve struggled with anxiety since I was very young, and when I wasn’t intensely playing basketball and I needed to feel calm, substances became a quick and easy fix.

My story is unique because my two best friends and I ended up being referred to Dave Smith around the same time. I ended up telling my parents my substance use was getting out of hand. I think they thought I was just smoking weed, partying and drinking, which was pretty typical at my high school, especially among the sports teams. That’s how we celebrated. It wasn’t really affecting my performance at first, but I don’t know how, physically, I was able to do the things I did. But I’ve had family members who were addicts, and I knew that something needed to change or it was going to end very badly. Using substances didn’t feel right, but it also felt good, so it was a huge back and forth all the time.

When one friend was referred to Dave Smith, my parents decided I should go too. We weren’t allowed to go together, but because my friend went first, I had time to sit with that. Honestly, when I got there, I felt so much weight fall off of me – it was like the pressures of everything around me were gone. I’m not saying it was all butterflies and wonderful, because there were breakdowns, wanting to leave and breaking rules and getting in trouble and stuff like that. But the Centre helped me take down all the walls I had been building up – and then I could start building myself back up into who I wanted to be.

Being at Dave Smith was an amazing experience that taught me so much self-awareness. It made me aware of things about myself that I didn’t know, like what my triggers were. I also learned that it was OK to ask for help and that I didn’t have to handle everything on my own. Dave Smith taught me resiliency and gave me a sense of independence, and with every win in treatment, my self-esteem improved. It also allowed me to be kid again in a safe space.

The staff were also unbelievable. Now that I’m working in the field I look back and I can’t believe they were able to give so much at work when they had their own lives to live too. They also inspired me. Because of my own experience, I had a strong desire to help others, so I completed the Child and Youth Worker program at Algonquin College, and now work in municipal social services.

If I hadn’t had that experience at the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre when I was younger, I honestly don’t know where I would be. When I close my eyes and meditate, sometimes one of the pictures I meditate on is a spot in Dave Smith because I remember sitting there and feeling completely at peace when I was a kid. It is so meaningful for me. I am so grateful to Dave Smith, and everyone who works there.

Haley is a graduate of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001
 

Village of Hope Stories – Sharron

“Dad could be serious at times, but there was a lot of laughter; every day I worked with him was so much fun. The Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre is his legacy, and it’s an absolute necessity in the community.”
— Sharron Smith, Dave Smith’s daughter and a DSYTC donor

 

Sharron Smith, Dave Smith’s daughter and a DSYTC donor: “Dad could be serious at times, but there was a lot of laughter; every day I worked with him was so much fun. The Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre is his legacy, and it’s an absolute necessity in the community.”

I worked with my dad for 35 years, running the catering business. Dad was involved with a lot of charities, but the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre was his baby. I remember more than 30 years ago when he learned that someone he knew had a son struggling with addiction. My Dad decided he had to do something about it, because that’s who he was.

My Dad was happiest when he was working hard – whether he was running his businesses, flipping hamburgers at a school fundraiser or acting as an auctioneer at a gala. He came from a big family, and my grandparents didn’t have very much. But from the time he was very young, Dad was always wanting to help people whenever he could. Organizing people around a cause, getting charitable initiatives off the ground and moving them forward – that was his passion.

Because I ran the catering business, I worked a lot of the fundraising events where my dad was the auctioneer. He was so happy raising money for the causes, like the DSYTC, that he cared about. He’d be up on stage, smiling from ear to ear, doing his thing. Sometimes the whole crew would stop and watch him in action. It was mesmerizing.

Dad could be serious at times, but there was a lot of laughter; every day I worked with him was so much fun, and I will always remember that. The Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre is his legacy, and it’s an absolute necessity in the community. Young people are struggling, and they need a place to go for live-in treatment that allows them to spend time away from unhealthy situations.

The new facility is going to be amazing. Not only will all the staff be together, but there will be so much space available for kids to study, and to participate in healthy activities like basketball. The extra capacity will also mean shorter wait times for young people who need help.

My dad and everyone at DSYTC worked so hard to help get the new Centre off the ground. He’ll be looking down on us the day it opens, and I think he’ll be in tears. We will all be crying tears of joy. All that hard work everyone did and then to finally cut that ribbon – holy smokes. That will be the day of all days.

Sharron Smith is Dave Smith’s daughter and a long-time supporter of the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre.

 
 
 




There’s been a lot of progress made on the new build!

 


112 Willowlea Road,
Carp, Ontario K0A 1L0
613-594-8333 ext.1201
Charitable Registration # 88992 6242 RR0001